Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBraman, Charles Austin
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-12T04:30:15Z
dc.date.available2018-07-12T04:30:15Z
dc.date.issued2018-05
dc.identifier.otherbraman_charles_a_201805_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/braman_charles_a_201805_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/38293
dc.description.abstractBait surveys were undertaken in the summers of 2016 and 2017 for ants on the primary dunes of three Georgian barrier islands. Species diversity was higher than expected, with multiple new records for the state. Assemblage abundance and incidence data indicate each island to be at a different stage of invasion by Solenopsis invicta, the red imported fire ant, with the ant assemblage composition and species richness of each islands affected by the degree of S. invicta presence. Collaborating sea turtle monitoring programs throughout the state collected ants from sea turtle nests which were most commonly S. invicta, but also multiple native ant species, implying that sea turtle nests may be an opportunistically scavenged resource by both invasive and native ants.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAnt assemblage
dc.subjectAnt diversity
dc.subjectCaretta caretta
dc.subjectFormicidae
dc.subjectIsland biogeography
dc.subjectLoggerhead sea turtle
dc.subjectPrimary dune
dc.subjectRed Imported Fire Ant
dc.subjectSolenopsis invicta
dc.titleLiving on the edge:
dc.title.alternativeants on the dunes of Georgia's barrier islands
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentEntomology Graduate Program
dc.description.majorEntomology
dc.description.advisorBrian Forschler
dc.description.committeeBrian Forschler
dc.description.committeeDaniel Suiter
dc.description.committeeKenneth G. Ross


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record