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dc.contributor.authorWeiler, Paul Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-13T04:30:14Z
dc.date.available2018-06-13T04:30:14Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.otherweiler_paul_a_201712_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/weiler_paul_a_201712_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/38235
dc.description.abstractIndividuals in the United States spend increasingly more time online and in virtual worlds, averaging 20.5 hours per week (Ofcom, 2015). I test a potential explanatory model for this shift, the Great Fantasy Migration hypothesis (GFM). The GFM proposes that the move to a virtual or fantasy realm is driven by a combination of high levels on narcissism and low levels of trust or confidence in the world. Virtual or fantasy realms allows esteem needs to be met without the level of challenge that it takes to meet these needs in the “real” world. In Study 1 (N=300) I tested participants’ levels of grandiose narcissism, pessimism, geek culture engagement, and time on social media. Study 2 (N=600) served as a preregistered replication of Study 1 with the addition of items testing the effects of gender and positive emotionality. Both studies supported the GFM.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectPersonality
dc.subjectsocial media
dc.subjectgeek culture
dc.subjectGreat Fantasy Migration
dc.subjectnarcissism
dc.titleThe great fantasy migration:
dc.title.alternativeexploring individual differences in the move to an online world
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorKeith Campbell
dc.description.committeeKeith Campbell
dc.description.committeeBrian Hoffman
dc.description.committeeNathan Carter


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