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dc.contributor.authorWoo, Brent
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-04T19:43:20Z
dc.date.available2018-06-04T19:43:20Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/38041
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents an analysis of the synchronic distribution and syntactic behavior of the English expression slash, as in These are my cats slash best friends. First, slash is a new type of coordinator: in nominal cases it productively coordinates two bare nominals resulting in an intersective reading. Second, it is semantically similar but syntactically distinct from similar combining mechanisms: intersective and, Latin cum, N-N compounding, and orthographic slash </>. Third, slash has a unique subcategorization requirement of only coordinating bare nouns (bartender slash dentist), adjectives, and verb phrases, but not clauses or full noun phrases (*the lawyer slash the doctor). By providing a range of examples showing productive use, I argue that slash is incorporated in the grammar of English, and that it is a unique example of innovation in the 'very closed' functional category of coordinators.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Linguistics Society at the University of Georgiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProceedings of the 3rd Annual Linguistics Conference at the University of Georgia (LCUGA3)
dc.titleEffable Slash: An Interactive Coordinator in English and its Behavior Slash Propertiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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