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dc.contributor.authorMemler, Julie Collette
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-09T05:30:20Z
dc.date.available2018-03-09T05:30:20Z
dc.date.issued2017-08
dc.identifier.othermemler_julie_c_201708_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/memler_julie_c_201708_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/37423
dc.description.abstractThe flipped classroom has become a popular teaching method with many high school teachers. Teachers provide students with learning opportunities outside of the classroom to gain content knowledge and then use class time to reinforce, through collaborative and or active learning activities, the content. The flipped class has been gaining popularity though little statistical research has been done to evaluate the effectiveness of this teaching method. The purpose of this study is to examine how well students learn physics content by using the flipped classroom, if the gender gap is reduced in a flipped classroom, and to identify students’ perceptions of their learning in a flipped class environment. The research was conducted in two Honors Physics classes at a high school in rural Georgia. Students were taught four units of physics; two units using a traditional teaching method and two units using the flipped classroom method. A quasi-experimental design was used because random groups could not be assigned. Both groups acted as the experimental group and the control group at different times in the study. In this study, it was found that there was no statistically significant difference between the two methods of teaching on unit tests and there was not a significant difference in gains between genders for the different methods. Student survey showed that students preferred traditional teaching methods over the flipped class environment.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectFlipped Classroom
dc.subjectConceptual Knowledge
dc.subjectHigh School Physics
dc.subjectGender
dc.titleThe effect of a flipped classroom on student academic achievement and the gender gap in high school physics
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentMathematics and Science Education
dc.description.majorScience Education
dc.description.advisorJulie Kittleson
dc.description.committeeJulie Kittleson
dc.description.committeeJi Shen
dc.description.committeeDavid Jackson
dc.description.committeeCory Buxton


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