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dc.contributor.authorEbetürk, Emre
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-14T17:57:11Z
dc.date.available2018-02-14T17:57:11Z
dc.date.issued2017-08
dc.identifier.otherebeturk_emre_201708_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/ebeturk_emre_201708_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/37309
dc.description.abstractHegel offers an original theory of life that does justice both to the purposive subjectivity and to the self-organizing objectivity of living things, and which demonstrates that these are not incompatible. This dissertation provides a comprehensive and critical commentary on Hegel’s theory of life, and aims to show that it is not only an outstanding attempt at a philosophical comprehension of life but also a serious challenge to accounts that conflate life with what it enables or what it requires. The first part focuses on Hegel’s logical categorization of life in the Science of Logic, which explicates the Idea of life as a logical category that is laid out irrespective of the kinds of living things there actually are. It first shows why the living individual is irreducible to mechanical and chemical processes, distinguishable from artifacts, and intelligible without bringing in any alien principle. Next, it elaborates on how the living individual as an internally purposive, self-sustaining, and self-driven process develops and maintains the collective unity of its objectivity, sustains and regenerates itself in the face of its other, and, through reproduction, raises its universal identity beyond its particular existence. The first part also investigates the extent to which Hegel’s characterization of the fundamental features of life allows for a distinction between merely organic unity and truly subjective unity that exhibits inner determinacy. The second part of the dissertation explores Hegel’s treatment of life in his Philosophy of Nature. In this work, he explicates plant and animal life as the two universal forms of life, whose universal features are enabled by similarly universal structures and processes of nature. In parallel with the three moments of the logical categorization of life, this part compares the organic unity, metabolism, and reproduction of the plant and the animal. It discusses the extent to which these forms reflect the logical categorization, and explains how the animal’s centralized sensitivity and responsiveness, along with its capacity for inner determinacy, affect the nature of its life processes in such a way that the animal realizes subjectivity, individuality, and self-determination at a higher level than does the plant.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightsOn Campus Only Until 2019-08-01
dc.subjectHegel
dc.subjectLife
dc.subjectLogic
dc.subjectNature
dc.subjectIdea
dc.subjectBiology
dc.subjectLiving Individual
dc.subjectOrganic Unity
dc.subjectLife-process
dc.subjectAssimilation
dc.subjectGenus-process
dc.subjectReproduction
dc.subjectPlant
dc.subjectAnimal
dc.subjectSubjectivity
dc.subjectSoul
dc.subjectSelf-determination
dc.subjectTeleology
dc.titleHegel's Idea of Life in Logic and Nature
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentPhilosophy
dc.description.majorPhilosophy
dc.description.advisorRichard Winfield
dc.description.committeeRichard Winfield
dc.description.committeeEdward Halper
dc.description.committeeElizabeth Brient


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