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dc.contributor.authorAllums, Coleman Alexander
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-14T17:29:49Z
dc.date.available2018-02-14T17:29:49Z
dc.date.issued2017-08
dc.identifier.otherallums_coleman_a_201708_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/allums_coleman_a_201708_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/37099
dc.description.abstractThere is considerable and increasing public attention being paid to urban secession and the politics of cityhood in the American South. This project intervenes to explore the ways in which cityhood functions as a political project to maintain—and reproduce—racialized political and material power structures. I utilize qualitative methods to show how urban secession in Atlanta functions as a racial project in a context of organized forgetting, uniquely contoured by the neoliberal turn in American governance and policy at multiple scales in the last half century. Movements for urban secession reproduce racialized relations and spaces of power, consolidating the benefits of historical domination and marginalization and obscuring this reproduction as merely an artifact of apolitical economic reason, producing a fundamental misrecognition of the processes and histories that continue to shape space and politics in Atlanta.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectRace
dc.subjectDemocracy
dc.subjectNeoliberalism
dc.subjectWhiteness
dc.subjectForgetting
dc.subjectPolitics of Space
dc.titleThe politics of urban secession
dc.title.alternativerace, class, and democracy in metro Atlanta's new cityhood movements
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentGeography
dc.description.majorGeography
dc.description.advisorSteven Holloway
dc.description.committeeSteven Holloway
dc.description.committeeHilda Kurtz
dc.description.committeeNikolas Heynen


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