Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAlinor, Malissa
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-14T17:29:49Z
dc.date.available2018-02-14T17:29:49Z
dc.date.issued2017-08
dc.identifier.otheralinor_malissa_201708_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/alinor_malissa_201708_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/37098
dc.description.abstractPrevious experimental research has shown that black men are perceived as more criminal than white men. Community leaders and the media claim that urban dress such as hoodies and wearing pants below the waist contribute to this perception. Yet, there is no empirical evidence that attire has this effect. In this study, I used the Implicit Association Test to investigate whether professional dress reduces the association of black men with criminality. I found that regardless of attire, participants more strongly associate black men with criminality as compared to white men.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightsOn Campus Only Until 2019-08-01
dc.subjectcriminality
dc.subjectexperiment
dc.subjectimplicit
dc.subjectbias
dc.subjectstereotype
dc.subjectrace
dc.subjectsocial psychology
dc.titlePerceived criminal
dc.title.alternativehow does attire influence the criminal perception of black men?
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentSociology
dc.description.majorSociology
dc.description.advisorJustine Tinkler
dc.description.committeeJustine Tinkler
dc.description.committeeDawn Robinson
dc.description.committeeJody Clay-Warner


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record