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dc.contributor.authorMaples-Keller, Jessica Lynn
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-31T04:30:38Z
dc.date.available2017-03-31T04:30:38Z
dc.date.issued2016-08
dc.identifier.othermaples-keller_jessica_l_201608_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/maples-keller_jessica_l_201608_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/36846
dc.description.abstractThe “Dark Triad” consists of three partially overlapping trait configurations that manifest in problematic interpersonal outcomes: narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism. A lack of insight is often noted in theoretical writing surrounding personality pathology, including those associated with the Dark Triad, but there is a relatively limited body of research empirically testing this notion. Comparing meta-perception based reports of personality, or how people believe others see them, to self-reports in relation to informant-reports allows for a direct test of the extent to which people are accurate in understanding how they are perceived by others. The present study (N=985) investigated how Dark Triad personality styles are viewed from multiple perspectives, including self-report, meta-perception, and informant-report (i.e., parent and peer-report), in an undergraduate sample. Absolute level differences were investigated and self-reports endorsed significantly more Machiavellianism and less narcissism than peer and parent-report. The relative convergence between meta-perception and informant-reports was moderate, and similar to the convergence between self-reports and informant-reports. Multiple regression analyses in which self-reports and meta-perceptions predicted informant-reports identified significance differences in the beta weights in 22 of the 46, or 48% of the analyses, and in 16 of the 22 cases, meta-perceptions were the stronger predictor. These findings suggest that while self-reports and meta-perceptions are closely related, people are able to provide information above and beyond their own view in regards to the Dark Triad. As such, researchers and clinicians may want to consider using meta-perception style questionnaires
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightsOn Campus Only Until 2018-08-01
dc.subjectPersonality
dc.subjecttraits
dc.subjectinterpersonal perception
dc.subjectpersonality disorders
dc.titleMeta-perception and the dark triad
dc.title.alternativetesting self and meta-perceptions in relation to psychopathy, narcissism, and machiavellianism
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorJoshua Miller
dc.description.committeeJoshua Miller
dc.description.committeeSarah Fischer
dc.description.committeeNathan Carter
dc.description.committeeW. Keith Campbell


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