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dc.contributor.authorVan De Velde, Jacqueline Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-31T04:30:17Z
dc.date.available2017-03-31T04:30:17Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.othervan-de-velde_jacqueline_e_201405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/van-de-velde_jacqueline_e_201405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/36826
dc.description.abstractIn 1897, W.E.B. Du Bois published an article in The Atlantic entitled “Strivings of the Negro People,” in which he introduced the concept of double consciousness: an struggle that Du Bois identified as inherent to the African American experience. In considering the imagery within Du Bois’s work, it could be argued that Du Bois was in truth arguing not for a double consciousness, but for a triple consciousness: of race, ethnicity, and nation. Drawing from the geographic locations and creative imagery used within Du Bois’s work, I assert my own “triple consciousness” – that of nation, race, and religion – and argue for its application beyond solely African American literature to literature which contains any immigrant experience. I will focus primarily on modern Muslim Women’s Literature, reading triple consciousness within the works of Leila Aboulela, Fadia Faqir, and Monica Ali.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectDouble Consciousness
dc.subjectDu Bois
dc.subjectOther
dc.subjectColonialism
dc.subjectImmigrant
dc.subjectHeadscarf
dc.subjectVeil
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectFadia Faqir
dc.subjectMonica Ali
dc.subjectLeila Aboulela
dc.titleTriple consciousness
dc.title.alternativeexploring nation, culture, and religion in Leila Aboulela, Fadia Faqir, and Monica Ali
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorEsra Santesso
dc.description.committeeEsra Santesso
dc.description.committeeJohn Lowe
dc.description.committeeValerie Babb


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