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dc.contributor.authorWang, Shiyu
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-28T04:30:55Z
dc.date.available2017-03-28T04:30:55Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.otherwang_shiyu_201605_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wang_shiyu_201605_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/36678
dc.description.abstractWe conducted a study to address uncertainties associated with the metabolism and net carbon fluxes for the tidal wetland and estuarine portion of the coastal ocean because of these zones disproportionately large role in ocean carbon dynamics. We measured open water diurnal O2 and CO2 dynamics seasonally in the Duplin River salt marsh-estuary in Georgia, USA with a particular focus on the marsh-estuary linkage associated with tidal flooding. We observed that the overall system was a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere and adjacent coastal ocean and a net sink for oceanic and atmospheric O2. Rates of metabolism were extremely high, with respiration (R: 43 mol/m2/yr) exceeding gross primary production (GPP: 28 mol/m2/yr). Rates of metabolism measured with CO2 were substantially higher than with O2. The net heterotrophy of the aquatic salt marsh-estuary system is supported primarily by the net production of the salt marsh proper.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectsalt marsh
dc.subjectestuary
dc.subjectmetabolism
dc.subjectCO2 exchange
dc.subjectO2 exchange
dc.subjectinundation
dc.titleInorganic carbon and oxygen dynamics in a marsh-dominated estuary
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentMarine Sciences
dc.description.majorMarine Sciences
dc.description.advisorCharles Hopkinson
dc.description.committeeCharles Hopkinson
dc.description.committeeDaniela Di Iorio
dc.description.committeeWei-Jun Cai


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