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dc.contributor.authorSainvil, Christine Mireille
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-08T05:30:12Z
dc.date.available2016-12-08T05:30:12Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.othersainvil_christine_m_201605_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/sainvil_christine_m_201605_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/36340
dc.description.abstractThere are many facets that make up a doctoral student’s life such as work, social, and family, and it is important to investigate their interactions and dynamics. The purpose of this study is to examine the personal experiences of African American doctoral students pursuing doctoral degrees at predominantly White institutions. Using a Grounded theory methodology as influenced by Critical Race Theory framework, I explored and conceptualized the multiple roles that 15 African American doctoral students must negotiate to successfully complete their programs. The themes that emerged from the data were space/ community, mentorship and advisor relationships, Being Other, Growth and Wellness.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectDoctoral Programs
dc.subjectAfrican American
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectPredominantly White Institutions
dc.titleThe lived experiences of African American doctoral students at a predominantly white institution
dc.title.alternativeimpact and influence on retention in degree programs
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentCounseling and Human Development Services
dc.description.majorCounseling Psychology
dc.description.advisorRosemary E. Phelps
dc.description.committeeRosemary E. Phelps
dc.description.committeeBrian A. Glaser
dc.description.committeeMelissa Freeman
dc.description.committeeEdward Delgado-Romero


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