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dc.contributor.authorMalone, Jacob Bradley
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-26T04:30:30Z
dc.date.available2016-10-26T04:30:30Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.othermalone_jacob_b_201605_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/malone_jacob_b_201605_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/36249
dc.description.abstractThe Internet has become an integral part of everyday life. Now, more than ever, it is important to understand these markets to best guide and inform public policy. This dissertation uses proprietary, high-frequency, subscriber-level data from various North American Internet Service Providers to study the demand side of residential broadband markets. In Chapter 1, I study how subscribers are currently using the Internet with a particular focus on the current role and importance of online video. In Chapter 2, I explore the implications of usage-based pricing and its ability to improve efficiency in broadband markets. In Chapter 3, I estimate subscriber demand of residential broadband where variation in network congestion and prices are included.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectbroadband
dc.subjectinternet
dc.subjectdemand
dc.titleEssays on the economics of broadband networks
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentEconomics
dc.description.majorEconomics
dc.description.advisorScott Atkinson
dc.description.committeeScott Atkinson
dc.description.committeeJonathan Williams
dc.description.committeeMeghan Skira
dc.description.committeeThomas Quan


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