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dc.contributor.authorDavison, Melanie
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-22T04:30:26Z
dc.date.available2016-09-22T04:30:26Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.otherdavison_melanie_201605_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/davison_melanie_201605_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/36070
dc.description.abstractDuring his lifetime, Henry Fuseli gained great fame for his painting The Nightmare; however, his art fell largely into obscurity during the nineteenth century. It wasn’t until the twentieth century when some critics perceived a kinship between Surrealist ideas and goals and Fuseli’s work that the artist reemerged into artistic discourse. From this point, artists and art historians examined Fuseli’s masterwork, The Nightmare, in order to understand how the artist and his painting fit with practices and perspectives of his contemporaries and what made him stand apart. This paper will examine the scholarship about Fuseli’s painting and how it has affected our interpretation of the work of art while also allowing us to see the perspectives and interests of the scholars themselves.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectHenry Fuseli, The Nightmare, Scholarship, Review, Reception
dc.titleHenry Fuseli’s The nightmare
dc.title.alternativean examination of the recent scholarship
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentArt
dc.description.majorArt History
dc.description.advisorAlisa Luxenberg
dc.description.committeeAlisa Luxenberg
dc.description.committeeJanice Simon
dc.description.committeeNell Andrew


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