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dc.contributor.authorCitro, Daniel Scott
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-13T04:30:16Z
dc.date.available2016-09-13T04:30:16Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.othercitro_daniel_s_201605_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/citro_daniel_s_201605_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/35878
dc.description.abstractSourced from the nightmare of hereditary doom, "Ropes, or, The Law" develops an understanding of poetic language as a state of exception and attends to the dialectic inherent in the law: an oscillation between the violence that establishes a limit and the violence that interrupts it. Haunting this relationship is always a third: the great criminal; the sovereign; the poet; the liar; the third man; the parasite; the Conqueror, who brings Death itself a sentence. The critical preface, drawing on the work of Georges Bataille, Walter Benjamin, Marcel Duchamp, and others, elaborates a notion of the creative act as a process of loss and a theory of poetry as excess—the irrational discourse that is opposed to rationality everywhere, the inscrutable, pure information, the interruption that troubles the signal, the beyond-sense given in any communication system, of which poetic language is a clearly marked case.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightsOn Campus Only Until 2018-05-01
dc.subjectNoise
dc.subjectinfrathin
dc.subjectexcess
dc.titleRopes, or, the law
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorJed Rasula
dc.description.committeeJed Rasula
dc.description.committeeAndrew Zawacki
dc.description.committeeAdam Parkes


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