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dc.contributor.authorChukwurah, Kengelle Queen
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-13T04:30:11Z
dc.date.available2016-09-13T04:30:11Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.otherchukwurah_kengelle-_q_201605_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/chukwurah_kengelle-_q_201605_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/35876
dc.description.abstractCellular membrane mimics offer an exchange between two neighboring aqueous droplets. This regulated exchange may prove useful for controlling the various agents in aqueous micro-environments. The following works focuses on characterizing the bacterial response within a synthetic cellular environment. In the droplet interface bilayer (DIB) approach, aqueous micro-droplets deposited in an oil reservoir with dissolved lipids are coated with lipid monolayers and arranged into artificial cellular networks. In this study, the response of bacteria within asymmetric droplet networks separating the bacteria and a chemoattractant highlighted the efficacy of the DIB approach.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightsOn Campus Only Until 2018-05-01
dc.subjectCellular Membranes
dc.subjectDroplet Interface Bilayer
dc.subjectEscherichia Coli
dc.titleIncorporation of stimuli-responsive bacteria in microfluidic droplets
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentBiological and Agricultural Engineering
dc.description.majorBiological Engineering
dc.description.advisorEric Freeman
dc.description.committeeEric Freeman
dc.description.committeeYajun Yan


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