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dc.contributor.authorGoodwin, Daleah B.
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T14:35:00Z
dc.date.available2016-09-01T14:35:00Z
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.identifier.othergoodwin_daleah_b_201408_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/goodwin_daleah_b_201408_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/35719
dc.description.abstract“‘A Torch in the Valley’: The Life and Work of Miss Hallie Quinn Brown, 1849-1949,” examines the challenges and accomplishments of a professional elocutionist, educator, and a founding member of the black clubwomen’s movement. Hallie Quinn Brown campaigned for equal access to education for African American women and political representation for women to reveal the vast intellectual possibilities of black womanhood. Her numerous short stories, lectures, and speech and rhetoric textbook demonstrate the power of language in effecting social change. Her edited encyclopedia Homespun Heroines and Other Women of Distinction (1926), the first black women’s biographical encyclopedia by black women, set a precedent for including African American female voices in history narratives. Brown’s innovative performance style merged recitation, lecture, song, and poetry in a manner that preserved African American cultural art forms while captivating national and international audiences. Although she lived and worked among a number of African American women and men now renowned for their work in black racial uplift, contemporary histories often fail to recognize her contribution. Building on biographic narrative and black feminist theory, I analyze the academic, social, theological, and political importance of Brown through a synergistic examination of her educational pedagogy and her involvement with the black women’s club movement. I document the public work and activism of Brown to reveal the ways black women maneuvered and positioned themselves to secure social equality and political enfranchisement, all while “uplifting the race.” This study of Brown’s life and work, a woman who worked, fought, and stood in the margins, will offer a nuanced portrait of not only black women but of black life at the turn of the twentieth century.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectHallie Quinn Brown
dc.subjectAfrican American women
dc.subjectAfrican Methodist Episcopal Church
dc.subjectNational Association of Colored Women
dc.subjectElocution
dc.title"A torch in the valley"
dc.title.alternativethe life and work of Miss Hallie Quinn Brown
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.description.majorHistory
dc.description.advisorDiane Batts-Morrow
dc.description.committeeDiane Batts-Morrow
dc.description.committeeRobert A. Pratt
dc.description.committeeChana Kai Lee
dc.description.committeeKathleen Clark


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