Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSon, Sujin
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-22T05:30:20Z
dc.date.available2016-01-22T05:30:20Z
dc.date.issued2015-05
dc.identifier.otherson_sujin_201505_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/son_sujin_201505_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/33871
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to explore how Adult Korean Adoptees’ (AKAs) evolving relationships with their birth families affect their developing senses of self. The study addresses the following research questions: RQ1. How do AKAs describe their evolving relationships with their birth families? RQ2. How have AKAs’ sense of self developed through their evolving relationships with their birth families? RQ3. What meaning do AKAs attach to the experience of reuniting with their birth families? A qualitative approach implementing narrative inquiry was used for this study. Open-ended interviews were conducted with eight Adult Korean Adoptees (AKAs) who have had reunion experiences with their birth families and have continuing relationships with their birth families. Analysis revealed four major themes. The first theme indicated that AKAs develop unique and distinctive family relationships with their birth families. The second theme revealed AKAs challenges with the language, culture, and social stigmas that make their relationships with their birth families complicated. The third theme showed that AKAs were satisfied with their experiences in terms of validating their identities by integrating knowledge about their origins and birth families. Finally, this study found that their evolving relationships with their birth families have had significant impacts on their understandings of themselves by increasing their attachment to their origin of birth. Three major conclusions were drawn from this study: 1.) AKAs increase the complexity of understanding self by building distinctive family affiliations with their birth families; 2.) AKAs generate developmental pathways by experiencing their cognitive maturation and connecting the self with others selectively; and finally, 3.) AKAs’ relationships with their birth families are turning points that precipitate the ongoing development of their senses of self in their adulthoods.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAdult Development
dc.subjectAdult Education
dc.subjectAdult Korean Adoptees
dc.subjectFamily Relationships
dc.subjectNarrative Inquiry
dc.subjectSense of Self
dc.subjectReunification
dc.titleSense of self
dc.title.alternativenarrative study of adult Korean adoptees’ evolving relationship with their birth families
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentLifelong Education, Administration, and Policy
dc.description.majorAdult Education
dc.description.advisorTalmadge Guy
dc.description.committeeTalmadge Guy
dc.description.committeeM. Elizabeth Vonk
dc.description.committeeAliki Nicolaides
dc.description.committeeJuanita Johnson-Bailey


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record