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dc.contributor.authorMin, Dong-Jun
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-13T05:30:16Z
dc.date.available2015-11-13T05:30:16Z
dc.date.issued2015-05
dc.identifier.othermin_dong-jun_201505_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/min_dong-jun_201505_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/33421
dc.description.abstractMarketers often attempt to persuade consumers to purchase their brands by frequently reaching out to consumers through promotional and communication efforts. As these practices have increased, so has the importance of consumers’ ability to make inferences and evaluate the appropriateness of persuasion attempts, as this is directly related to the probability of making an optimal decision. My dissertation aims to extend extant knowledge about the cognitive processes involving sequential marketing communications by investigating how the structure of repeated persuasive attempts systematically influences consumer’s perceptions, processing of information, attitudes and behavior. With this goal in mind, my dissertation identifies three factors that influence the cognitive processes that precede consumer judgment and decision making: (1) the amount of alterations within a sequence of recurring marketing communications, (2) the order in which marketing information is presented, and (3) the amount of perceived risk in the context of consumer choice. Overall, my dissertation contributes to the literature in consumer information processing by shedding light onto novel factors that may affect consumers’ psychological responses to sequential marketing communications and product information, and provide marketers with the knowledge needed to ensure that consumer’s reaction to marketing communications are in line with the marketer’s intentions.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightsOn Campus Only Until 2017-05-01
dc.subjectSequential Marketing Communications
dc.subjectJudged Randomness
dc.subjectTiming of Advertisement Repetition
dc.subjectValue Trade-offs and Risk
dc.titleConsumers’ psychological response to sequential marketing communications
dc.title.alternativeperceptions, information processing, and behaviors
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentBusiness Administration
dc.description.majorBusiness Administration
dc.description.advisorMarcus Cunha Jr.
dc.description.committeeMarcus Cunha Jr.
dc.description.committeeJulio Sevilla
dc.description.committeeCharlotte Mason
dc.description.committeeJohn Hulland


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