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dc.contributor.authorDavis, Ruth Emily
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-25T04:30:29Z
dc.date.available2015-09-25T04:30:29Z
dc.date.issued2015-05
dc.identifier.otherdavis_ruth_e_201505_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/davis_ruth_e_201505_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/32695
dc.description.abstractThis thesis primarily looks at Mexican immigrants’ and Mexican Americans’ resistance to school segregation in southern California from 1924-1946. Particularly, it examines how these individuals used race to make claims for educational equality. By charting a shift in activists’ rhetorical use of race during these years, it suggests that Mexican Americans’ conceptions of their own racial identities diverged substantially from those of their largely Mexican-born parents. The thesis further suggests that the Chicano Movement’s celebration of a non-white identity perhaps had its roots in the racial conceptions of the Mexican-American Civil Rights Movement.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectMexican-American Generation
dc.subjectSchool Segregation
dc.subjectActivism
dc.subjectRacial Formation
dc.subjectImmigration
dc.subjectNational Identity
dc.subjectCalifornia
dc.subjectMexican-American Civil Rights Movement
dc.titleRed-blooded Americans
dc.title.alternativeracial identity and the Mexican-American crusade for equal education, 1924-1946
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.description.majorHistory
dc.description.advisorPamela Voekel
dc.description.committeePamela Voekel
dc.description.committeeOscar Chamosa
dc.description.committeeRonald Butchart


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