Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCuttner, Allison Kathleen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-25T04:30:27Z
dc.date.available2015-09-25T04:30:27Z
dc.date.issued2015-05
dc.identifier.othercuttner_allison_k_201505_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/cuttner_allison_k_201505_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/32692
dc.description.abstractWhile a majority of scholarship on a state’s response to dissent focuses on repression and accommodation, the latter policy is not always feasible. This study discusses a third possible response to dissent, cooptation, and introduces a conceptual framework to apply to state responses. I conduct an empirical analysis using the costs and benefits of substitutable state responses. The results suggest a substitution between repression and cooptation, as past respect for physical integrity rights is associated with an increase in the number of parties in autocracies facing dissent. This study has important implications for future work on state responses to dissent and autocratic institutions, as well as potential policy recommendations for disincentivizing the use of repression in response to dissent.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightsOn Campus Only Until 2017-05-01
dc.subjectDissent
dc.subjectCooptation
dc.subjectRepression
dc.subjectAutocracies
dc.subjectAuthoritarian Regimes
dc.titleState responses to dissent
dc.title.alternativethe choice to coopt
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentInternational Affairs
dc.description.majorInternational Affairs
dc.description.advisorK. Chad Clay
dc.description.committeeK. Chad Clay
dc.description.committeeDaniel Hill
dc.description.committeeJeffrey Berejikian


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record