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dc.contributor.authorDe Masi, Roberto
dc.contributor.authorAccoto, Salvatore
dc.contributor.authorOrlando, Stefania
dc.contributor.authorDe Blasi, Vincenzo
dc.contributor.authorPasca, Sergio
dc.contributor.authorScarpello, Rocco
dc.contributor.authorSpagnolo, Leo
dc.contributor.authorIdolo, Adele
dc.contributor.authorDe Donno, Antonella
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-01T18:46:12Z
dc.date.available2015-09-01T18:46:12Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-31
dc.identifier.citationBMC Neurology. 2015 Jul 31;15(1):125
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12883-015-0377-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/32069
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Selective immune adsorption (SIA) is an emerging method for treating immune-mediated neurological diseases, given its superior safety profile compared to plasma exchange (PEX). However, the available literature concerning Multiple Sclerosis includes no cases of SIA applied to steroid-refractory rebound after Fingolimod discontinuation. Case presentation Here we report the case of a 32-year-old woman suffering from multiple sclerosis treated with Fingolimod and admitted to a Multiple Sclerosis Centre after drug discontinuation due to the occurrence of lymphopenia. During the few weeks preceding admission, the patient experienced progressive and severe neurological deterioration that did not respond to an initial cycle of pulsed high doses of intravenous 6-methyl prednisolone (IVMP). Given the ineffectiveness of a second cycle of IVMP, the patient was treated with plasma immunoadsorption, leading to dramatic functional recovery. The patient then started a neuro-rehabilitation program. About one month after the final SIA procedure the patient started Natalizumab-based therapy, while maintaning a stable neurological condition. We noted significant modification of C3/C4 complement components and total gamma globulin concentrations (IgG) during SIA. Conclusions Our observations show that however serious, steroid-refractory neurological deterioration occurring after Fingolimod discontinuation in multiple sclerosis can be treated with selective immune-adsorption therapy which thus represents a good alternative in these cases. It could be speculated that this clinical condition was associated with pattern II of demyelination, given the good response to a form of treatment that acts on autoantibodies. Thus, SIA represented an effective therapeutic strategy for this case of relapsed MS as steroid-resistent rebound post Fingolimod cessation.
dc.titleDramatic recovery of steroid-refractory relapsed multiple sclerosis following Fingolimod discontinuation using selective immune adsorption
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.date.updated2015-07-31T03:49:38Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderDe Masi et al.


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