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dc.contributor.authorHarrak, Hind
dc.contributor.authorNormand, Isabelle
dc.contributor.authorGrinker, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorElftouh, Naoual
dc.contributor.authorLaurin, Louis-Philippe
dc.contributor.authorLafrance, Jean-Philippe
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-01T17:58:29Z
dc.date.available2015-09-01T17:58:29Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-28
dc.identifier.citationBMC Nephrology. 2015 Jul 28;16(1):115
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12882-015-0112-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/31916
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Vascular access-related infections and septicemia are the main causes of infections among hemodialysis patients, the majority of them caused by Staphylococcus species. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) has recently been reported with a probable antistaphylococcal activity. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of ASA on the risk of dialysis-related infection and septicemia among incident chronic hemodialysis patients. Methods In a nested case–control study, we identified 449 cases of vascular access-related infections and septicemia, and 4156 controls between 2001 and 2007 from our incident chronic hemodialysis patients’ cohort. Cases were defined as patients hospitalized with a main diagnosis of vascular access-related infection or septicemia on the discharge sheet (ICD-9 codes). Up to ten controls per case were selected by incidence density sampling and matched to cases on age, sex and follow-up time. ASA exposure was measured at the admission and categorized as: no use, low dose (80–324 mg/d), high dose (≥325 mg/d). Odds ratios (OR) for infections were estimated using multivariable conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Compared to no use, neither dose of ASA was associated with a decreased risk of infection: low dose (OR 1.03, 95 % CI 0.82-1.28) and high dose (OR 1.30, 95 % CI 0.96-1.75). However, diabetes (OR = 1.32, 95 % CI = 1.07–1.62) and anticoagulant use (OR = 1.62, 95 % CI = 1.30–2.02) were associated with a higher risk. Conclusion Among hemodialysis patients, ASA use was not associated with a reduced risk of hospitalizations for dialysis-related infections or septicemia. However, ASA may remain beneficial for its cardiovascular indications.
dc.titleAssociation between acetylsalicylic acid and the risk of dialysis-related infections or septicemia among incident hemodialysis patients: a nested case–control study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.date.updated2015-07-29T19:03:04Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderHarrak et al.


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