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dc.contributor.authorMoreno, Marta
dc.contributor.authorSaavedra, Marlon P
dc.contributor.authorBickersmith, Sara A
dc.contributor.authorLainhart, William
dc.contributor.authorTong, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorAlava, Freddy
dc.contributor.authorVinetz, Joseph M
dc.contributor.authorConn, Jan E
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-01T17:25:54Z
dc.date.available2015-09-01T17:25:54Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-30
dc.identifier.citationMalaria Journal. 2015 Jul 30;14(1):290
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12936-015-0804-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/31791
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Malaria transmission in the peri-Iquitos region of Amazonian Peru has been designated as seasonal and hypo-endemic with recently described hyper-endemic hotspots. Despite relatively recent distribution of long-lasting insecticidal bed nets (LLINs), malaria in Amazonian Peru persists and increased substantially in 2014 compared to previous years. Anopheles darlingi, identified as the main malaria vector, is known for its variable behaviour depending on locality and environment. Methods To evaluate vector biology metrics in relation to seasonality and malaria transmission, mosquito collections were carried out in three localities in the peri-Iquitos region, Loreto, Peru in 2011–2012. Human landing catch (HLC) collection method, Shannon (SHA) and CDC trap types were compared for effectiveness in a neotropical setting. Abundance, human biting rate and entomological inoculation rate (EIR) were measured to provide an updated view of transmission patterns post-LLIN distribution. Results HLC collected significantly more anopheline mosquitoes than SHA and CDC light traps. Anopheles darlingi was the most prevalent species in all three villages (84% overall). Biting patterns varied depending on trap type, season and village. EIR varied temporally (monthly) and spatially and the highest (2.52) occurred during the 2012 malaria outbreak in Cahuide. Unexpectedly there was a high infection rate (1.47 and 1.75) outside the normal malaria transmission season, coincident with a second local outbreak in Cahuide. The first identification of Anopheles dunhami and Anopheles oswaldoi C in Peru, using molecular markers, is also reported in this study. Conclusion These data underscore the importance of HLC as the most meaningful collection method for measuring vector biology indices in this region. The highest monthly EIR provides additional evidence of seasonal transmission in riverine localities correlated with high river levels, and An. darlingi as the only contributor to transmission. The trend of an increase in outdoor-biting together with early-evening infected mosquitoes may undermine the effectiveness of LLINs as a primary malaria intervention.
dc.titleImplications for changes in Anopheles darlingi biting behaviour in three communities in the peri-Iquitos region of Amazonian Peru
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.date.updated2015-07-29T18:30:09Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderMoreno et al.


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