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dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Christopher Ross
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-08T04:30:17Z
dc.date.available2015-07-08T04:30:17Z
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.identifier.otherjohnston_christopher_r_201412_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/johnston_christopher_r_201412_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/31443
dc.description.abstractInvasive species are a costly problem on roadsides in Georgia that require chemical and cultural control. Currently, agronomists manage invasive weeds with mowing and herbicide applications on grassy roadsides but alternative strategies are needed to enhance the potential for long-term control. Restoration through the establishment of sustainable native plant communities may be an effective alternative for invasive weed control on Georgia roadsides. Species selection, seeding timing, seeding rate, and location could influence the establishment of native species under roadside conditions and warrant further investigation. In field experiments, the native species blackeyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta L.), indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans (L.) Nash), lanceleaf coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata L.), swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata L.) and wild bergamot (Monarda fistulosa L.) had high potential for successful establishment on Georgia roadsides. Seeding of native species in the spring generally had faster initial establishment than fall seeding. Greenhouse studies indicated that Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers.), a problematic roadside weed, had a higher competitive growth than indiangrass during establishment. Mowing 60 days after seeding reduced Johnsongrass and indiangrass biomass 88% and 4% at 30 days after mowing, respectively. Results suggest that sequential mowing following regrowth may reduce the competitiveness of Johnsongrass with indiangrass.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectBlackeyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta L.)
dc.subjectCompetition
dc.subjectIndiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans (L.) Nash)
dc.subjectJohnsongrass (Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers.)
dc.subjectLanceleaf coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata L.)
dc.subjectMowing
dc.subjectNative species
dc.subjectRestoration
dc.subjectSwamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata L.)
dc.subjectWild bergamot (Monarda fistulosa L.)
dc.titleNative plant establishment and competition with an invasive species on Georgia roadsides
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentCrop and Soil Sciences
dc.description.majorCrop and Soil Sciences
dc.description.advisorPatrick McCullough
dc.description.committeePatrick McCullough
dc.description.committeeDon Shilling
dc.description.committeeJames Affolter


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