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dc.contributor.authorBramlett, Elisabeth Jane
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-12T04:31:15Z
dc.date.available2015-06-12T04:31:15Z
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.identifier.otherbramlett_elisabeth_j_201412_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/bramlett_elisabeth_j_201412_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/31390
dc.description.abstractIn The Winter’s Tale, Shakespeare inverts the settings of his source, Robert Greene’s Pandosto, by placing Leontes, the jealous husband and parallel to the Bohemian king Pandosto, in Sicily and Polixenes, the opposite of Greene’s Sicilian king Egistus, in Bohemia. It is unclear why Shakespeare makes this change, and the purpose of this project is to investigate the possible reasons for this reversal. I believe Shakespeare made this change both to place Leontes literally in the vicinity of the entrance to the Christian otherworld, and to strengthen the parallel between the myth of Proserpina and the loss and recovery of Perdita (and Hermione). Examining the Christian elements of the play alongside the myth of Ceres and Proserpina will be the focus of this essay.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectN/A
dc.titleSicily and the otherworld in the Winter's tale
dc.title.alternativefrom Proserpina to Purgatory
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentComparative Literature
dc.description.majorComparative Literature
dc.description.advisorRonald Bogue
dc.description.committeeRonald Bogue
dc.description.committeeCharles Doyle
dc.description.committeeThomas Cerbu


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