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dc.contributor.authorBelasco, Andrew Steven
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-18T05:31:00Z
dc.date.available2014-12-18T05:31:00Z
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.identifier.otherbelasco_andrew_s_201408_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/belasco_andrew_s_201408_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/30861
dc.description.abstractSchool-based counselors are the primary facilitators of college transition for many students, yet little is known about their influence on college-going behavior. Given the need to improve college participation rates, and given the substantial number of students who rely on school personnel to access college, the following, two-part dissertation aims to assess the relationship between school-based college counseling and postsecondary attendance, and devotes special attention to the postsecondary destinations of students with low socioeconomic status. Analyzing data from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002, Part One employs coarsened exact matching and multilevel modeling to examine the effects of student-counselor visits on postsecondary enrollment, as well as determine whether the effects of such visits vary by socioeconomic status. Results suggest that visiting a counselor for college entrance information has a positive and significant influence on students’ likelihood of postsecondary enrollment, and that counseling-related effects are greatest for students with low socioeconomic status. Part Two is a multi-state analysis and employs difference-in-differences modeling to assess the enrollment-related effects of the National College Advising Corps (NCAC), an organization that aims to supplement the work of school counselors and help guide low-SES and other underrepresented students through the college admissions and financial aid processes. Results suggest that NCAC and other similar organizations may improve college-going in high schools that primarily serve low-SES students and where enrollment rates are less than what measures of high school achievement and college readiness would indicate. In sum, both studies reveal the positive influence that school-based college counselors may have on improving the postsecondary enrollment of low-SES and other disadvantaged students.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectschool counseling
dc.subjectpostsecondary enrollment
dc.subjectlow-SES
dc.subjectmultilevel modeling
dc.subjectcoarsened exact matching
dc.subjectdifference-in-differences
dc.titleCreating college opportunity
dc.title.alternativethe influence of school-based college counseling on postsecondary enrollment
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentInstitute of Higher Education
dc.description.majorHigher Education
dc.description.advisorJames C. Hearn
dc.description.committeeJames C. Hearn
dc.description.committeeErik C Ness
dc.description.committeeManuel Gonzalez Canche


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