Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWilson, Gloria Jannette
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-21T05:30:28Z
dc.date.available2014-11-21T05:30:28Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.otherwilson_gloria_j_201405_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wilson_gloria_j_201405_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/30731
dc.description.abstractWith respect to the discipline of art education, there is an understanding that a smaller percentage of art teachers of color exist than in the overall general teacher workforce (Galbraith & Grauer, 2004). The following life history case studies of three African American art teachers, examine—through personal narratives—how each experiences and reconciles their social and professional identities of African American/artist/teacher. Aiming to locate their life stories as they operate in particular social, historical, and institutional circumstances, the task with each participant in this study was to understand and render elements of their lives in context. Looking at the career decisions African Americans have made about teaching as a profession, when a multitude of options are available and more specifically, those who have embraced teaching art, this study reveals how Black Americans have in fact, negotiated full participation in spaces where they are often discussed as under-represented. Employing counter narratives of agency and resiliency through creation of written portraits, this study revealed how each participant negotiated and embraced these multiple identities. Applying methods of narrative analysis and portraiture and using an Afrocentric paradigm in tandem with theories of agency (social cognitive theory) and social identity, the researcher gaze is turned toward an affirmation of forces that surround and embrace these individuals through an initial exploration of the anthropological concept of fictive kinship. In doing so, a case is made for the implementation of culturally responsive pedagogy and mentorship.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectINDEX WORDS: African American
dc.subjectBlack
dc.subjectteacher
dc.subjectart teacher
dc.subjectidentity
dc.subjecteducation
dc.subjectart education
dc.subjectarts participation
dc.subjectrace
dc.subjectracial identity
dc.subjectAfrocentrism
dc.subjectnarrative
dc.subjectsocial cognitive theory
dc.subjectsocial identity theory
dc.subjectgroup identity
dc.subjectculturally responsive
dc.subjectfictive kinship
dc.subjectlife history
dc.subjectportraiture
dc.subjectnarrative
dc.subjectmethod
dc.subjectmethodology.
dc.titleCenter of gravity
dc.title.alternativelife history case studies of three African American art teachers reconciling multiple identities
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentArt
dc.description.majorArt Education
dc.description.advisorCarole Henry
dc.description.committeeCarole Henry
dc.description.committeeRichard Siegesmund
dc.description.committeeFreda Scott Giles
dc.description.committeePeggy Kreshel
dc.description.committeeTracie Costantino


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record