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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Kevan Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-21T05:30:23Z
dc.date.available2014-11-21T05:30:23Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.otherwilliams_kevan_j_201405_mla
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/williams_kevan_j_201405_mla
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/30728
dc.description.abstractThe term “Waterscape” and related concepts suggest hybrid systems comprised of infrastructure and natural processes. The concept is a useful one for landscape architects and planners who are increasingly investigating rivers and other aquatic spaces. Waterscape is a potential member of a growing family of contemporary site typologies in design discourse that emphasize inherent processes as well as well as physical form. Identification of this site as a distinct element in the landscape could contribute to the development of a specific sustainable design agenda to address modern issues facing rivers. With the idea of a sustainable design approach for rivers in mind, this thesis asks how designers mobilize those critical conceptions of rivers to reconnect the Savannah River.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectRivers
dc.subjectdams
dc.subjectdam removal
dc.subjectecological restoration
dc.subjectsustainability
dc.subjectlandscape architecture
dc.subjectwaterscape
dc.subjectinfrastructure
dc.titleWaterscaping
dc.title.alternativereconfiguring the Savannah River
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMLA
dc.description.departmentCollege of Environment and Design
dc.description.majorLandscape Architecture
dc.description.advisorJon Calabria
dc.description.committeeJon Calabria
dc.description.committeeDouglas Pardue
dc.description.committeeLeigh Askew Elkins


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