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dc.contributor.authorSutton, Jamie Michael
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-11T05:30:22Z
dc.date.available2014-11-11T05:30:22Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.othersutton_jamie_m_201405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/sutton_jamie_m_201405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/30672
dc.description.abstractI undertake to examine the fundamental question: How does America define religion? This question is the heart of struggles to integrate rapidly growing minority religions in the United States and the increased rise of secularism as a potent political ideology. The answer to this question, for proponents of both privileged Christianity and an open and pluralistic legal “hands-off” approach to religion, have a meaningful and direct connection in people’s minds to the essence of what it means to be an American. I will focus the current project on the legal definition of religion in America as adjudicated by the courts. The judicial system has evolved in its views over time, but the derived powers of the court at least provide a mechanism by which answers can be decidedly authoritative, even if only for the limited purposes of the justice system.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectLaw
dc.subjectConstitution
dc.subjectSupreme Court
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectPluralism
dc.titleIn God we trust
dc.title.alternativedefining "American" religion
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentReligion
dc.description.majorReligion
dc.description.advisorBaruch Halpern
dc.description.committeeBaruch Halpern
dc.description.committeeCarolyn Medine
dc.description.committeeSandy Martin


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