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dc.contributor.authorStrickland, Tiffany
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-11T05:30:17Z
dc.date.available2014-11-11T05:30:17Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.otherstrickland_tiffany_201405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/strickland_tiffany_201405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/30668
dc.description.abstractThrough a corpus-based discourse analysis of various texts from four different food-selling chains– Earth Fare, Trader Joe’s, Kroger, and Family Dollar – this study examines how different grocery stores use language to express representations of class identity of their intended clientele. Textual analysis shows that food advertisers target affluent consumers by using more complex language and words that emphasize the naturalness of products. To appeal to working class customers, food advertisers choose language that emphasizes convenience and value. Negation emerges as a discoursal trend used to create distinction. Overall, the patterns of language use that emerged in this corpus suggest that a class disparity exists in the experience of grocery shopping in the United States and that this disparity is linguistically-coded in grocery store discourse.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectadvertising language
dc.subjectfood language
dc.subjectcorpus-based
dc.subjectdiscourse analysis
dc.titleEat their words
dc.title.alternativea corpus-based analysis of grocery store discourse
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentLinguistics Program
dc.description.majorLinguistics
dc.description.advisorJonathan Evans
dc.description.committeeJonathan Evans
dc.description.committeeDon McCreary
dc.description.committeeCharles Doyle


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