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dc.contributor.authorNeill, Casey Ruth
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-14T04:30:25Z
dc.date.available2014-10-14T04:30:25Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.otherneill_casey_r_201405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/neill_casey_r_201405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/30570
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the thesis is to examine the portrayals of eros, both its perceived origin and effects on the human body, and eros-afflicted women, who might be compelled to act against the established socio-political norm. Helen and Medea are used as a lens through which any potential changes or shifts in Greek thought over time may be identified. The thesis progresses chronologically through time beginning with Homer and concluding in the fourth and third centuries B.C.E.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectEros in Ancient Greece
dc.subjectEros
dc.subjectWomen and Eros
dc.subjectWomen in the Ancient World
dc.subjectErotic Desire
dc.subjectErotic Anxiety
dc.subjectHelen
dc.subjectMedea
dc.titleEros and the eros-afflicted
dc.title.alternativeancient Greek erotic anxiety through the myths of Helen and Medea
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentClassics
dc.description.majorClassical Languages
dc.description.advisorCharles Platter
dc.description.committeeCharles Platter
dc.description.committeeNaomi Norman
dc.description.committeeChristine Albright


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