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dc.contributor.authorMartin, Adam Taylor
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-09T04:30:16Z
dc.date.available2014-10-09T04:30:16Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.othermartin_adam_t_201405_mhp
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/martin_adam_t_201405_mhp
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/30537
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines why and how heirloom bulbous plants have been preserved by individuals and organizations in the United States. Bulbs are an important biotic cultural resource seen in historic landscapes. The thesis reviews various methods used to preserve bulbs according to type and provides insights to understand why people have preserved them. The methods of preservation are presented in chapters according to commonalities. The various motivations are then analyzed and presented as a synthesized set of answers to the main thesis question.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectHeirloom, Historic, Bulbs, Bulbous Plants, Geophyte, Cultural Landscape, Biotic Cultural Resource, Passalong Plants, Historic Preservation
dc.titleHeirloom bulbs
dc.title.alternativehorticultural rarities, "passalong" plants, & biotic cultural resources
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMHP
dc.description.departmentCollege of Environment and Design
dc.description.majorHistoric Preservation
dc.description.advisorWayde Brown
dc.description.committeeWayde Brown
dc.description.committeeRichard Simpson
dc.description.committeeCari Goetcheus
dc.description.committeeBrad Davis


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