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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Japera
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-25T04:30:18Z
dc.date.available2014-09-25T04:30:18Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.otherjohnson_japera_201405_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/johnson_japera_201405_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/30490
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this dissertation is to explore the development strategies of successful underrepresented scientists in biomedical and health disciplines, with a specific focus on their acquisition and use of social capital and science capital. Exploring the experiences of successful scientists, as evidenced by their receipt of one of the most prestigious research awards, the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) pre-doctoral fellowship, this dissertation provides a useful platform to unearth how these scientists developed and progressed through the scientific academic pipeline. Three manuscripts motivated by asset bundle theory were developed to pursue this objective. The asset bundle theory argues that scientific capital, social capital and economic capital are all necessary requisites for the fluid movement of a scientist through the academic pipeline. Using survey data collected from 505 recipients NRSA, the first manuscript examines social capital transfers to successful underrepresented scientists; it argues that social capital theory applications in the literature has undervalued the cultural and social resources important to the development of underrepresented scientists. The second manuscript explores the experiences of underrepresented scientists and suggests a focus on the ways in which cultural experiences and identities of underrepresented groups are relevant to their success. The final manuscript demonstrates that asset bundle theory, when applied to the use and development of science capital, underscores the need to better explore the institutional conditions in which scientists develop. The paper empirically explores the correlation between endowments of science assets and the potential for economic outcomes, finding little correlation between the two for underrepresented scientists.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectUnderrepresented scientist
dc.subjectMinority scientist
dc.subjectUnderrepresented minority
dc.subjectEconomically disadvantaged scientist
dc.subjectAsset Bundle Theory
dc.subjectSocial Capital Theory
dc.subjectHabitus
dc.subjectScience Pipeline
dc.subjectBiomedical and Health Scientist
dc.subjectScience, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) pipeline
dc.subjectDevelopment of Doctoral Scientists
dc.titleApplication and implications of asset bundle theory on the development of successful underrepresented scientists
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentPublic Administration and Policy
dc.description.majorPublic Administration
dc.description.advisorHal G. Rainey
dc.description.committeeHal G. Rainey
dc.description.committeeBrian N. Williams
dc.description.committeeVicky M. Wilkins
dc.description.committeeBarry Bozeman


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