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dc.contributor.authorHobson, Taylor Ryan
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-18T04:30:35Z
dc.date.available2014-09-18T04:30:35Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.otherhobson_taylor_r_201405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hobson_taylor_r_201405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/30473
dc.description.abstractThis paper considers Sarah Morris’ 2004 film Los Angeles and its potential success as a “city portrait,” a description encourage by the artist’s work in both painting and film. The film invokes a number of established cinematic modes – both avant-garde and commercial – without explicitly favoring any one tradition. Morris thereby appropriates the visual vocabulary of Hollywood while maintaining a distance that reveals her cinematic maneuvers as such. As a portrait of the city‘s own visual language, I argue that Los Angeles articulates a divide between literal, urban location and Hollywood simulation. Furthermore, a reading of the film alongside the fragmented, commercial form of the feature trailer reveals the inherent ability of the cinematic medium to perpetuate desire and projected fantasy within its spectator.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectSarah Morris
dc.subjectLos Angeles
dc.subjectFilm trailers
dc.subjectSimulacrum
dc.subjectDesire
dc.subjectExperimental film
dc.subjectContemporary Art
dc.titleProjection as paradise in Sarah Morris' Los Angeles
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentArt
dc.description.majorArt History
dc.description.advisorIsabelle Loring Wallace
dc.description.committeeIsabelle Loring Wallace
dc.description.committeeRichard Neupert
dc.description.committeeNell Andrew


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