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dc.contributor.authorHammock, Christen Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-18T04:30:19Z
dc.date.available2014-09-18T04:30:19Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.otherhammock_christen_e_201405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hammock_christen_e_201405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/30460
dc.description.abstractVampires, zombies, and other monsters have long been written about as a narrative space to work through collective anxieties, and the latest incarnation of these paranormal stories is no exception. What is remarkable is that many of these stories have adopted a Southern setting to explore Otherness. In this thesis, I seek to explore the role that Southern milieus plays in three television shows: The Walking Dead, True Blood, and Dexter. These shows are deeply invested in the culture and history of different “Souths,” ranging from the “Old South” of rural Georgia to a new, transnational South in Miami, Florida. I argue that this trend stems from the South’s hybrid existence as both colonizer and colonized, master and slave, and that a nuanced engagement with various Souths presents a narrative space of potential healing and rehabilitation.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectVampires
dc.subjectZombies
dc.subjectDexter
dc.subjectThe Walking Dead
dc.subjectTrue Blood
dc.subjectTransnational
dc.subjectSouthern literature
dc.subjectTelevision
dc.subjectU.S. South
dc.titleSouthern monsters in southern spaces
dc.title.alternativetransnational engagements in contemporary television
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorJohn Lowe
dc.description.committeeJohn Lowe
dc.description.committeeEsra Santesso
dc.description.committeeChristopher Pizzino


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