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dc.contributor.authorGarner, James Donathan
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-12T04:30:15Z
dc.date.available2014-09-12T04:30:15Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.othergarner_james_d_201405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/garner_james_d_201405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/30434
dc.description.abstractWhile John Milton’s work attends to many issues incendiary in seventeenth-century politics, one concern persists across his career: language’s potential either to reveal truth or conceal falsity. Beginning with the proposition that Milton believes truth and eloquence are inextricable, this thesis argues that Areopagitica’s truth metaphors represent an idealized ethos that orators should possess. Conceptualizing how Milton’s truth might exemplify a rhetorical ethos, the first chapter argues that Milton’s truth dwells as much within those who seek it as it is an object to be sought. The second and third chapters argue that Milton critiques the Renaissance affinity for sophistry and its deleterious effects on communication through Books 2 and 9 by showing persuasive acts neither guided by nor searching for Milton’s truth.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectJohn Milton
dc.subjectParadise Lost
dc.subjectAreopagitica
dc.subjectAristotle
dc.subjectAugustine
dc.subjectIsocrates
dc.subjectrhetoric
dc.subjectethos
dc.subjecttruth
dc.subjectGorgias
dc.subjectsophistry
dc.titleTruth's armoury
dc.title.alternativerhetorical ethos in John Milton's Areopagitica and Paradise lost
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorChristy Desmet
dc.description.committeeChristy Desmet
dc.description.committeeMiriam Jacobson
dc.description.committeeCharles Doyle


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