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dc.contributor.authorFreeman, Tonjua Benita
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-11T04:30:15Z
dc.date.available2014-09-11T04:30:15Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.otherfreeman_tonjua_b_201405_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/freeman_tonjua_b_201405_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/30428
dc.description.abstractThe achievement of Black students in the United States continues to fall below the achievement of their White classmates. The purpose of this multiple case study was to seek science teachers’ pedagogical philosophies related to increasing levels of achievement for Black students in science. Critical race theory was used as the theoretical framework. Four high school biology teachers (one Black male, one White male, and two White females) from two rural, public schools in the Southeastern region of the United States shared their philosophies about helping Black students to attain high levels of achievement in science. Data were collected through interviews, classroom observations, demographic questionnaires, and lesson artifacts. While there were multiple findings, the findings can be broken down into four categories: (a) teacher characteristics, (b) student characteristics, (c) classroom environment, and (d) instruction, curriculum, and assessment characteristics. The participants suggested such things as integrating students’ lives into lessons, creating comfortable classroom environments, using varied instructional strategies and assessments, and developing positive relationships with students and parents. The findings have implications for further research.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectBlack students
dc.subjectscience teachers
dc.subjectscience teacher educators
dc.subjectrace
dc.subjectculture
dc.subjectcurriculum
dc.subjectinstruction
dc.subjectassessment
dc.subjectscience education
dc.subjectmultiple case study
dc.subjectcritical race theory
dc.titleIncreasing levels of achievement for black science students
dc.title.alternativelearning from the experiences of effective teachers
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentMathematics and Science Education
dc.description.majorScience Education
dc.description.advisorMary Atwater
dc.description.committeeMary Atwater
dc.description.committeeJuanita Johnson-Bailey
dc.description.committeeDavid Jackson
dc.description.committeeMalcolm Butler


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