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dc.contributor.authorBell, Jennifer Denise
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-31T04:30:15Z
dc.date.available2014-07-31T04:30:15Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.otherbell_jennifer_d_201405_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/bell_jennifer_d_201405_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/30297
dc.description.abstractGeospatial analysis was used to analyze obesity prevalence in the United States in 2010 while assessing the effects of income, race, education, and exposure to pollutants to account for the processes behind the socio-spatially uneven increase in obesity across the nation. Ordinary least squares (OLS) and geographically weighted regression (GWR) models were used to determine the influence of these variables on the prevalence of obesity. Similar methodologies were implemented for the state of Louisiana to provide a comparison to nation-wide observations. This research compliments individual-level studies by assessing the spatial interaction between bodies and the environment. Acknowledging health disparities in the United States, results of this work offer an insight into the racial, economic, and educational inequalities that lead to disproportionate exposure to toxins and prevalence of obesity.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectObesity
dc.subjectToxic Release Inventory (TRI) Sites
dc.subjectHealth Disparities
dc.subjectPollutants
dc.subjectGeographically Weighted Regression (GWR)
dc.titleBMI and POPs
dc.title.alternativeassociation between persistent organic pollutants and increasing obesity prevalence in the United States
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentGeography
dc.description.majorGeography
dc.description.advisorXiaobai Yao
dc.description.committeeXiaobai Yao
dc.description.committeeJerry Shannon
dc.description.committeeLan Mu


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