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dc.contributor.authorLi, Hongjia
dc.contributor.authorPattathil, Sivakumar
dc.contributor.authorFoston, Marcus B
dc.contributor.authorDing, Shi-You
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Rajeev
dc.contributor.authorGao, Xiadi
dc.contributor.authorMittal, Ashutosh
dc.contributor.authorYarbrough, John M
dc.contributor.authorHimmel, Michael E
dc.contributor.authorRagauskas, Arthur J
dc.contributor.authorHahn, Michael G
dc.contributor.authorWyman, Charles E
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-19T20:13:47Z
dc.date.available2014-06-19T20:13:47Z
dc.date.issued2014-04-04
dc.identifier.citationBiotechnology for Biofuels. 2014 Apr 04;7(1):50
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1754-6834-7-50
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/29883
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Agave, which is well known for tequila and other liquor production in Mexico, has recently gained attention because of its attractive potential to launch sustainable bioenergy feedstock solutions for semi-arid and arid lands. It was previously found that agave cell walls contain low lignin and relatively diverse non-cellulosic polysaccharides, suggesting unique recalcitrant features when compared to conventional C4 and C3 plants. Results Here, we report sugar release data from fungal enzymatic hydrolysis of non-pretreated and hydrothermally pretreated biomass that shows agave to be much less recalcitrant to deconstruction than poplar or switchgrass. In fact, non-pretreated agave has a sugar release five to eight times greater than that of poplar wood and switchgrass . Meanwhile, state of the art techniques including glycome profiling, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Simon’s Stain, confocal laser scanning microscopy and so forth, were applied to measure interactions of non-cellulosic wall components, cell wall hydrophilicity, and enzyme accessibility to identify key structural features that make agave cell walls less resistant to biological deconstruction when compared to poplar and switchgrass. Conclusions This study systematically evaluated the recalcitrant features of agave plants towards biofuels applications. The results show that not only does agave present great promise for feeding biorefineries on semi-arid and arid lands, but also show the value of studying agave’s low recalcitrance for developments in improving cellulosic energy crops.
dc.titleAgave proves to be a low recalcitrant lignocellulosic feedstock for biofuels production on semi-arid lands
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.date.updated2014-04-23T23:28:14Z
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewed
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderHongjia Li et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


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