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dc.contributor.authorDenmon, Aubrey Michelle
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-09T04:30:20Z
dc.date.available2014-05-09T04:30:20Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.otherdenmon_aubrey_m_201312_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/denmon_aubrey_m_201312_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/29755
dc.description.abstractStigma has been defined in previous literature as a feeling of personal denigration or defamation due to the presence of a discrediting attribute, such as an obvious physical impairment or illness. The phenomenon seems to be categorized as a relatively stable experience, in which individuals are expected to either face an ongoing and full-strength manifestation, or none at all. Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has received a fair amount of stigma-related research interest owing to the negative social appraisals accompanying both the label of the condition and the associated behaviors. Qualitative interviews with 22 university students diagnosed with ADHD demonstrates that stigma is not a constant experience, but rather one that fluctuates in intensity and duration within the context of daily interactions. Further, students resist the stigma associated with ADHD by using strategic mechanisms common to the resistance of mental illness stigma.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectADHD
dc.subjectStigma
dc.subjectResistance
dc.titleExperiencing and managing stigma
dc.title.alternativeinsights from college students with ADHD
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentSociology
dc.description.majorSociology
dc.description.advisorJames Coverdill
dc.description.committeeJames Coverdill
dc.description.committeeRonald Simons
dc.description.committeeLinda Grant


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