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dc.contributor.authorDemosthenes, Lori Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-09T04:30:19Z
dc.date.available2014-05-09T04:30:19Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.otherdemosthenes_lori_e_201312_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/demosthenes_lori_e_201312_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/29754
dc.description.abstractEarly glasses, known since c. 2500 BC (Henderson 2013), used plants (ash) and minerals (natron) as sources for alkali to flux silica. Mineral and plant alkali samples from the Corning Museum of Glass were combined with quartz from Spruce Pine, North Carolina in a series of experiments to make glass. Oxygen isotope compositions of alkali samples and quartz were measured at various stages of the glass-making process. Initial differences of oxygen isotope compositions gradually converge with higher heating temperatures. Glasses produced with mineral and plant alkali sources could not be distinguished based on oxygen isotope compositions. Therefore, oxygen isotope compositions are not useful in identifying the alkali source used in glass-making.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectnatron, glass, plant ash, oxygen isotopes
dc.titleExperimental analysis of ash and mineral sources for ancient glasses using oxygen isotopes
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentGeology
dc.description.majorGeology
dc.description.advisorSamuel Swanson
dc.description.committeeSamuel Swanson
dc.description.committeePaul A. Schroeder
dc.description.committeeDouglas Crowe


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