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dc.contributor.authorCarter, Coletta Marquece
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-06T04:30:14Z
dc.date.available2014-05-06T04:30:14Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.othercarter_coletta_m_201312_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/carter_coletta_m_201312_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/29726
dc.description.abstractThis study explored the academic outcomes of African American male students in a two-year college setting in relation to selected pre-college and remediation placement variables to determine their overall rate of success. Specifically Astin’s Input-Environment-Output (I-E-O) model was used to investigate the differences among the stated variables. The input variables for this study were high school GPA, diploma type, SAT/ACT scores, Pell eligibility, and race (Black and White). The environmental variables were remediation placement and outcomes. The output variables for this study were successful completion of college-level math and English, persistence at three and six years, graduation, and transfer. The sample consisted of all of the Black and White male students in the 2002, 2003 and 2004 cohorts placed in remedial reading, English or math courses at the time of matriculation. To address the research questions, both multiple linear regression and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted. The results indicated that academic preparation was significantly more important than being a Black male and socioeconomic status in strongly influencing the types of remediation placement and the overall student success in remediation at the study site. The study further found that Black males in remediation at the study site do not do as well as their White male counterparts in completing college-level math and English and persisting to graduation from two-year or four-year colleges. The findings of this study indicate the importance of a rigorous academic curriculum during high school to prepare students for academic success in college. In addition the findings are consistent with the trends of underachievement of African American males when compared to other ethnic subgroups in institutions of higher education.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAfrican-American males
dc.subjectBlack males
dc.subjectPre-college Factors
dc.subjectRemediation
dc.subjectDevelopmental Education
dc.subjectTwo-year Colleges
dc.titleUnderstanding African American male student success in a two-year college
dc.title.alternativea regression analysis of pre-college factors and remediation
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentInstitute of Higher Education
dc.description.majorHigher Education
dc.description.advisorJames C. Hearn
dc.description.committeeJames C. Hearn
dc.description.committeeKaren Webber
dc.description.committeeLaura Dean


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