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dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Jessie Anne
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-01T04:30:16Z
dc.date.available2014-05-01T04:30:16Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.otherbarnett_jessie_a_201312_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/barnett_jessie_a_201312_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/29716
dc.description.abstractGiven the rate of smoking in the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) population is two times higher than in the general population, smoking cessation has become a major public health issue. The purpose of this study is to explore smoking cessation among LGBTQ individuals, including their smoking history, factors contributing to smoking uptake, methods used during quit attempts, and how the most successful quitters, called Confident Maintainers, manage to stay quit. While the individual, social, and environmental risk factors for smoking in LGBTQ individuals are well documented and existing research supports the notion that LGBTQ identity is a risk factor for adopting smoking, there is a lack of information about how LGBTQ identity and social context are involved in quitting smoking. Data from LGBTQ participants in Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the current study confirms LGBTQ-specific risk factors for smoking uptake. Surprisingly, findings also indicate LGBTQ identity is not heavily tied to quitting, nor does it seem to influence the quitting process. In the end, the challenges present when quitting smoking seem to be unique to quitting smoking — not to LGBTQ identity. This finding, along with important results about successful quitting methods, has major implications for further research and practice that are discussed herein.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectSmoking cessation
dc.subjectLGBTQ
dc.subjectLesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer
dc.subjectSequential exploratory design
dc.subjectMixed methods
dc.subjectQualitative methods
dc.subjectGrounded theory
dc.subjectDescriptive analysis
dc.subjectSocial ecological model
dc.subjectTranstheoretical model
dc.subjectSocial cognitive theory
dc.subjectSelf-efficacy
dc.subjectConfident maintenance
dc.titleA sequential exploratory examination of successful smoking cessation among LGBTQ individuals
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentHealth Promotion and Behavior
dc.description.majorHealth Promotion and Behavior
dc.description.advisorJessica Muilenburg
dc.description.committeeJessica Muilenburg
dc.description.committeeCorey Johnson
dc.description.committeeSu-I Hou
dc.description.committeeMarsha Davis


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