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dc.contributor.authorLee, Hyunji
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-05T16:07:15Z
dc.date.available2014-03-05T16:07:15Z
dc.date.issued2002-05
dc.identifier.otherlee_hyunji_200205_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/lee_hyunji_200205_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/29579
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study is to define the caregiving stress process of Korean daughters-in-law who provide care for their parents-in-law in the same household and to investigate to what extent filial obligation is related to the variables in the caregiving stress process. A survey using a structured questionnaire was conducted to address the research questions. Participants were 152 caregiving daughters-in-law who live with their parents-in-law in the same household in Korea.|The findings of the study revealed that filial obligation was an important component which helped to explain the variation of caregiving satisfaction and caregiving burden in the caregiving process model. However, filial obligation did not impact on the explaining the variance of caregiving outcomes, which were life satisfaction and depression. Caregiving daughters-in-law with higher levels of filial obligation seemed to experience higher levels of caregiving satisfaction and life satisfaction regardless of the levels of social support, while they were likely to experience lower levels of caregiving burden when the effect of social support was controlled. Positive relationships were exhibited between caregiving burden and depression, and between caregiving satisfaction and life satisfaction when controlling for the levels of social support. A negative relationship was revealed between caregiving burden and life satisfaction regardless the levels of social support. Additionally, social support showed stronger relationships with caregiving burden and depression than with caregiving satisfaction and life satisfaction, however, the findings indicated that social support had little impact on the caregiving process. In conclusion, this study attempted to test the caregiving process model developed in the Western culture within the context of Korean culture, and provided a useful conceptual framework and information for better understanding of Korean family caregiving practices.
dc.languageExperience of caregiving daughters-in-law in South Korea
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectCaregiving
dc.subjectDaughters-in-law
dc.subjectParents-in-law
dc.subjectThe Elderly
dc.subjectFilial Obligation
dc.subjectCaregiving Tasks
dc.subjectCaregiving Satisfaction
dc.subjectCaregiving Burden
dc.subjectSocial Support
dc.subjectLife Satisfaction
dc.subjectDepression
dc.titleExperience of caregiving daughters-in-law in South Korea
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentSchool of Social Work
dc.description.majorSocial Work
dc.description.advisorMargaret Robinson
dc.description.committeeMargaret Robinson
dc.description.committeeKevin DeWeaver
dc.description.committeeLarry Nackerud
dc.description.committeeAdam Davey
dc.description.committeeSeock-Ho Kim


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