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dc.contributor.authorBond, Beverly Allen
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-05T16:03:42Z
dc.date.available2014-03-05T16:03:42Z
dc.date.issued2002-08
dc.identifier.otherbond_beverly_a_200208_edd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/bond_beverly_a_200208_edd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/29495
dc.description.abstractRecent accountability-based educational reform packages have widely used test scores as “evidence” to determine crucial decisions regarding achievement, placement, and promotion of students; and funding, status, and autonomy of school systems and personnel. As schools conformed to the escalating pressures, changes in educational practice began to proliferate—leading to a dilemma where tests and test-specific teachingessentially dominated the educational scene. This study attempted to determine whichareas (with regard to these issues) showed statistically different perceptions between legislators and educators. Participants were polled by use of an original questionnaire, featuring items drawn from the review of literature and findings from research of a similar nature in other states. Packets of 6 identical instruments were mailed to 100 randomly selected Georgia elementary schools and to the entire membership of the State of Georgia Educational Legislative Committees (634 instruments). Assurance of participants’ anonymity and other safeguards against bias were part of the design. Return rates were 32%, 25%, and 18% respectively for legislators, principals, and teachers, but postal regions indicated satisfactory representation across the state. Statistical analyses included use of One-Way Anova, Fisher’s Exact, and descriptive statistics. Results indicate a strong endorsement of the existing knowledge base and findings from previous research in other states. Significant differences of opinion between legislators and educators were detected in 48% of the items. Respondents representing districts with contrasting urbanicity, ethnicity, and poverty showed dissimilar perspectives; and discrepancies between the publicized accountability agenda and the consequences experienced by educators and students were also evident.
dc.languageHigh-stakes testing : issues under debate in political and educational arenas
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAccountability
dc.subjectConsequential Validity
dc.subjectEducational Reform
dc.subjectElementary Education
dc.subjectInstructional Effectiveness
dc.subjectMeasurement Driven Instruction
dc.subjectQuestionnaires
dc.subjectStandardized Achievement Tests
dc.subjectStandards
dc.subjectTesting Effects
dc.titleHigh-stakes testing : issues under debate in political and educational arenas
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreeEdD
dc.description.departmentEducational Leadership
dc.description.majorEducational Leadership
dc.description.advisorC. Thomas Holmes
dc.description.committeeC. Thomas Holmes
dc.description.committeeJohn Dayton
dc.description.committeeC. Kenneth Tanner
dc.description.committeeL. David Weller
dc.description.committeeSally J. Zepeda


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