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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Cristina
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T22:00:34Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T22:00:34Z
dc.date.issued2002-08
dc.identifier.otherwilliams_cristina_200208_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/williams_cristina_200208_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/29351
dc.description.abstractOverconfidence is a pervasive reasoning bias and refers to unwarranted confidence in one’s knowledge or judgment. Most reasoning theories acknowledge that people reason both analytically and intuitively. Past research has revealed that intuitivelyoriented individuals commit more reasoning biases. The hypothesis of this study was that heuristic processing contributes to the overconfidence bias. Two hundred seventeen participants completed a general-knowledge calibration task assessing overconfidence and Epstein’s Rational Experiential Inventory (REI) measuring analytic and intuitive thinking styles. Results supported the hypothesis that intuitive thinking style is a significant predictor of overconfidence.
dc.languageIndividual differences in thinking styles and overconfidence
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectindividual differences
dc.subjectoverconfidence
dc.subjectthinking styles
dc.titleIndividual differences in thinking styles and overconfidence
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorAdam Goodie
dc.description.committeeAdam Goodie
dc.description.committeeRobert Mahan
dc.description.committeeRichard Marsh


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