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dc.contributor.authorWester, James Brandon
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T22:00:32Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T22:00:32Z
dc.date.issued2002-08
dc.identifier.otherwester_james_b_200208_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wester_james_b_200208_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/29349
dc.description.abstractThis study of how the gods are depicted in the Iliad focuses on the words of the characters themselves. I compare and contrast the speech-patterns of the poem’s divine and mortal figures, concentrating on three types of speech: quarrels, commands, and prophecies. An examination of the diction, syntax, formulae, and narrative effects of these speeches reveals how the Homeric poet-performer characterized the gods as superior to humans both ontologically and epistemologically. In the consideration of quarrels we see the basic contrast between the ineffective human method of handling conflict and the relatively successful way in which the Olympian characters resolve disputes through dialogue. The section on commands takes this observation one step further by demonstrating the relative stability of the divine hierarchy. The examination of prophetic language shows the importance of divine knowledge to the poet-performer’s characterization of the gods and its usefulness as a narrative and performative device.
dc.languageLanguage of gods and men
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectIliad
dc.subjectHomer
dc.subjectGreek gods
dc.subjectcharacterization
dc.subjectoral poetry
dc.titleLanguage of gods and men
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentClassics
dc.description.majorClassics
dc.description.advisorNancy Felson
dc.description.committeeNancy Felson
dc.description.committeeJared Klein
dc.description.committeeCharles Platter


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