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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Christopher Mitchell
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T22:00:10Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T22:00:10Z
dc.date.issued2002-08
dc.identifier.othersmith_christopher_m_200208_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/smith_christopher_m_200208_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/29315
dc.description.abstractResidents of New York City began building community gardens in the early 1970s as a means of cleaning up the blighted city. There were estimated to be more than 750 community gardens by the late 1990s. In early 1999, the City of New York announced plans to auction 114 community gardens in May 1999. After being effectively denied of their input into the planning process in accord with the City’s Urban Land Use Review Procedure, I argue that community garden advocates constructed a politics of scale in order to contest, and eventually stop, the proposed land auction.
dc.languageSowing together a fractured landscape : New York City community garden activism at the end of the twentieth century
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightsOn Campus Only
dc.subjectCommunity gardens
dc.subjectNew York City
dc.subjectLand-use conflict
dc.subjectThe political construction of scale.
dc.titleSowing together a fractured landscape : New York City community garden activism at the end of the twentieth century
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentGeography
dc.description.majorGeography
dc.description.advisorHilda Kurtz
dc.description.committeeHilda Kurtz
dc.description.committeeAndrew Herod
dc.description.committeeDeborah Martin


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