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dc.contributor.authorMcCallister, Andrew Beecher
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T21:59:31Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T21:59:31Z
dc.date.issued2002-08
dc.identifier.othermccallister_andrew_b_200208_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/mccallister_andrew_b_200208_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/29255
dc.description.abstractThis is a history of the town and waterfalls at Tallulah Falls, Georgia. It focuses on a thirty-five-year period when that saw the region transform from an isolated area, to a popular tourist destination, and finally the site of a large hydroelectric dam. The process of building the dam was highly controversial and led to the first large environmental movement in Georgia. Ultimately the movement failed, but the battle to save Tallulah Falls touched on issues of Progressivism, conservation, gender, the “Lost Cause,” the “new South,” and industrialization that give an insight into the political and social climate of early twentieth century Georgia.
dc.language"A source of pleasure, profit, and pride"
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectTallulah Falls, Helen Dortch Longstreet, Georgia Power, Hydroelectric Dam, Conservation, Progressivism, New South, Lost Cause, Gender, Tourism
dc.title"A source of pleasure, profit, and pride"
dc.title.alternativetourism, industrialization, and conservation at Tallulah Falls, Georgia, 1820-1915
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.description.majorHistory
dc.description.advisorJohn Inscoe
dc.description.committeeJohn Inscoe
dc.description.committeeKathleen Clark
dc.description.committeePaul Sutter


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