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dc.contributor.authorOsborn, Kyle Nicholas
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T21:13:50Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T21:13:50Z
dc.date.issued2013-08
dc.identifier.otherosborn_kyle_n_201308_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/osborn_kyle_n_201308_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/29141
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation uses social-cognitive theory to analyze the emotions of white Southerners as they experienced secession and the Civil War. It argues that white Southerners showcased two major personality types of high-efficacy and low-efficacy during this time frame. It furthermore suggests that that each personality type heavily influenced how individual Southerners envisioned secession, their Northern enemy, and the necessary level of brutality in waging the war for Southern independence.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectCivil War, secession, Old South, emotions history, social-cognitive theory.
dc.titleMasters of fate
dc.title.alternativeefficacy and emotion in the Civil War South
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.description.majorHistory
dc.description.advisorJohn Inscoe
dc.description.committeeJohn Inscoe
dc.description.committeeLaura Mason
dc.description.committeeJames C. Cobb
dc.description.committeeStephen Berry


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